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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 144 (some duplicates have been removed)
with lawmakers as lyndon johnson did. >> yeah, far guy who is so smart it really does puzzle me. perhaps jod city or john can answer as to why he just doesn't appreciate the fact that personal relationships matter in politics at every level always have going back to lincoln. look at spielberg's film. 2013 always will. he doesn't do it terribly well, maybe that's why he wants to suggest it doesn't matter. i agree with everything that jodi just said about some of the opportunities. i do think it's worrisome and not just a parochial matter. it's worrisome that they aren't bringing more people in not just because diversity of voices and views helps but some of these people are tired. some of these people-- particularly economic people-- they are spent, charlie. i wish there were -- you had this sense there was an infusion of fresh ideas and fresh blood. not to change views and change him but just to kind of bring more vital toy the tail rather than just get ready for the big fight. senator chuck schumer has a theory to go to al's point that he tells his colleagues which is that because president obam
-in that are tragedies. i mean you have john f. kennedy being killed in dallas and lyndon johnson quickly being sworn in. or when warren harding tied and coolidge sworn in. there are many examples of that. the simplicity of this, the fact that the weather is good. this is important that we remind ourselves today that we are all americans. we're not democrats. we're not republicans. we're not independents. this is our president for a second term >> pelley: there's so many rancor in an election immediately preceding an inauguration and so much rancor as policy gets to be made. inauguration day is a 24-hour period when that all seems to be put away >> one hopes so. we live in these you know, just terrible partisan times right now. but let's put the bickering aside. i think the fun of tomorrow is going to be guessing what's the president going to say? it's going to be 50 years this year of the "i have a dream speech" of martin luther king. 150 years of the emancipation proclamation. they have this historic african-american president. once again he said barack hussein obama today. using his middle name like
of the "wall street journal." joe califano, once an aid to lyndon johnson. taylor branch, author of a new book on race. and james peterson of lehigh university. we'll round it out with the newest brother act in politics, san antonio mayor julian castro and his air, dentical twin, joaquin castro, just elected to congress. that's a big group but there's a lot to talk about on "face the nation." captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news in washington, "face the nation" with bob schieffer. >> and good morning again. we welcome to the broadcast david plouffe, architect of the president's election in 2008, again last year a key adviser in the administration throughout. let me ask you first about the situation in algeria, where this awful terrorist attack took place. we know that there were seven americans at that compound, and the reports are one is dead. do you have any more information on any of the others? >> i don't this morning, bob. obviously, if and when we have additional information, the state department will release that >> and what about this whole state of terrorism now? have we defeated
in public spaces? >> i think very carefully, just as in navigated the relationship with lyndon johnson. he went out of his way to avoid taking a public position opposed to johnson on the war or poverty issues. it was only after a great deal of deliberation, a great deal of time had passed, and when he felt like he could do nothing else other than take a public stance. that is what is going on in the black community today. i think all of us recognize that the energy has to come from the grassroots. that those of us who feel that the president needs to go further, and i think it barack obama were sitting here, he would say, yes, i like to go farther in terms of dealing with these issues of poverty and specific issues of the black community, but he would also say, you have to push me. that does not necessarily come from him deciding which are the greatest party as he has to deal with. just as johnson also said, look, i have a lot of priorities as president. if you love me to deal with is a voting rights issue, as king did in 1964 and 1965, you have to push me. king went out and helped stage t
with democratic leaders, lyndon johnson. i talked with the brookings scholar who was a young aide in the eisenhower white house. he said eisenhower was deeply not do anything. an and lbj but he knew to make things work you had to have this getting along. the key difference here is johnson, rayburn, o'neal, they could deliver. this president does not have someone who can deliver and in the senate, republicans have abused the fill bupser. -- filibuster. >> describe eisenhower? >> he was devious. >> he was the most devious person nixon had ever known. you said, i mean that in a positive sense. >> they could work together. >> reagan was not actually dealing with a house my majority, -- minority, that there was a conservative majority in the house. when you add the republicans and conservative democrats. what we had was ideological sorting since then of the the parties were nor geographical. nowadays if you're conservative, you're republican. if you're a liberal, you're a democrat. obama is up against an actual majority of conservative house members. reagan didn't have to face a majori
, eisenhower worked quietly behind the scenes with the senate majority leader, lyndon johnson, to gain approval of his legislative agenda. ronald reagan developed a close relationship with the democratic speaker of the house tip o'neill, to somehow fulfill his legislative goals, compromise as they were. it might be cynical to postulate that some of nixon's rather liberal legislations forays were prompted by his desire to get along with a democratic-controlled congress. woodrow wilson was the target of republican party that wanted to even many a squabble they had with the president. he defeated both william howard taft and theodore roosevelt to win his first term. he spearheaded liberal legislation they opposed, and got approval of the league of nations that would be selected to vent republican party hostility to wilson. the treaty was never approved. the votes were there for approval, but the president allowed compromise, but wilson stood firm. it was the president, not congress, that refused to compromise. one of the most successful relationships between a president and congress occurred durin
is the king of them all so it's a little bit of a -- lyndon johnson picked up a couple. lyndon johnson and again i'm using every authority i can find. but lyndon johnson i'm sure he picked this up from -- but pressing the flesh was johnson-ism. i will be down there in a flash and lady bird gets credit for motorcade. didn't exist before she comes up with motorcade and it's picked up by "time" magazine. there is no elise written example that has been used before. richard nixon has some nice ones. depending on your point of view. the silent majority is his and excellent ability is a coinage that either he or his speechwriters when they're going over the records of the watergate they use that term. if something is censored or bleeped its deleted which became its own curse word. another one which was really interesting is when he started talking about winding down the war. and winding down seemed to be sort of a winding up. it created some real response at that time. george herbert walker bush came up with new world order which was his. he got that from somewhere else that made it his own a
? he said i am very familiar with the literature on second-term overreach. we both loved lyndon johnson. i don't think he ever read two words on second-term overreach. probably should have. but the point is that he is very aware of what has gone before and he knows that if you don't read all these books about previous presidents, previous leaders, really in world history, you're limiting yourself to yore own personal experience and that is pretty bad. >> is there a particular president, doris, with whom this president identifies the most or respects the most? >> well, i think when he first came into office, obviously, lincoln mattered a great deal to him. i mean, in part probably because the emancipation proclamation, the end of slavery, and he's the first african-american president, almost like closing that circle. but i think as his term went on he was reading about franklin roosevelt, teld di roosevelt. i think there's a sense when the problems change the president that you look back to changes as well. otherwise, we historians would be useful if we didn't help other know what i mean
dominated the political scene. lyndon johnson grittily be very goldwater and richard nixon, overwhelming george mcgovern. each of those elections, one of the candidates failed to capture the spirit of the american voting public and the winner had the advantage of a weak opponent. franklin roosevelt won his second term landslide because of huge popularity. and many of our presidential elections, the candidates are in a fitted title to present themselves as the one capable of serving the country with the winner is walking off with the modern maturity. the customary wisdom that the campaign between the incumbent president and his opponent will be either a referendum on the first term of the president or a judgment of which candidate would be the better theater. is there really a difference between these two considerations? is it not boil down to judging the leadership skill of the incumbent based on effectiveness during his first term versus the unknown leadership skills of the challenger. it's easy to point to the national security or economic consequences impact on the ratings have been i
president to be sworn in by a woman? president lyndon johnson, john kennedy, bill clinton, or george w. bush? >> bill clinton? [ buzzer ] >> you're a winner too. >> yes, you are. >> all right, kim kardashian gets my book. so the correct answer here, president lyndon johnson. >> lyndon johnson. you might remember that famous, famous picture on air force one after president kennedy was assassinated. he was sworn in by a dallas judge, sarah hughes. >> okay. well, thank you so much. that was -- we learned a lot, and kathie lee is going to come back across the street now, and we're going to talk to a woman who knows a thing or two about money. our good friend suze orman is with us. we're going to speak with her after this. ♪ ng, and teaching it took to earn it. so we give you the power to keep as much of your hard-earned money as possible. our customized interview covers everything from a service member's deployment, to a student's loan interest, right down to a teacher's crayons. you've worked hard to earn your money. we're here to help you keep it. turbotax-- the power to keep what's yours. t
. franklin roosevelt was moved by later movements. lyndon johnson had the civil rights movement. i think we begin with that. this book comes out at a moment when the country sees the power and possibility of occupy, 99%, and how that has shifted. it is still evolving. it has shifted the center of political gravity of our dialogue. the issue has been off the radar for so long. >> roosevelt surfed and harnessed those movements. he used them to get legislation passed to initiate programs. obama is still getting on his wet suit. to read the essay she wrote in 2008, there was a sense of exhibits -- exuberance. you say that hope is not optimism that expects things to turn out well. it seems like he confused those two things. >> i will come back to what i write about in the book. the expectations were so great and high. go back to 2008. the back to the election and year when we are fortunate region were fortunate enough to be living with debates that were not cruel reality shows. every week, there were debates among the democratic candidates. barack obama embodied change. it seemed he brought into
. >> surely finding osama bin laden, surely passing civil rights legislation as lyndon johnson was able to do and before that, surely defeating the nazis was a much more formidable task than taking on the gun lobby. >> so if we can defeat the germans in world war ii, i guess the n.r.a. is supposed to be-- is that what he's saying? >> right, he's giving himself a little bit of wiggle room. i didn't exactly compare the nra to the nazis, stew $them in the same spot and let the audience sort it out. we're sure to see, on gun owners opponents of gun control and language when you see words likenazis. george orwell in 1946 a famous essay, the word fascism should only be used for people with hitler and-- that was 1946, 70 years later we're still doing it. >> jon: do you see it differently, judy? >> not really, i thought that schieffer was very close to the line of advocacy as opposed to reading the news and being straight about a news story. i do think that even though there was no direct comparison there's clearly an inference that the n.r.a. is equivalent to the nazis and raises questions whether o
to the end of it. >> you can make argument against term limits. but lyndon johnson understood, he had a few months. just a few months. that's when he got voting rights done. that's when he got a lot of those major pieces of great society legislation done, was in those months of 1965. medicare, all that. and so, i think we're likely to see a lot of activity right now. >> on immigration, guns, debt. all coming up. we're going to get that all day long here. >>> i want to go back to josh elliott on pennsylvania avenue. you're giving us a little weather, right, josh? >> it's a beautiful day. you were speaking of the battle lines drawn. let today stand as it is, an oasis of unity. one that is brisk but sunny. we want to thank our sam champion dearly for the weather we have in the nation's capital today, sam. >> just because it could have been worse. we've had everything. it's the topic all politicians and news folks will agree on today. washington's weather regularly changes in january. ronald reagan had the warmest and the coldest inauguration day. 55 degrees, and the coldest ever, 7 degrees in
in the nation's capital with estimates ranging as high as 1.9 million people. until then, lyndon johnson held the record crowd of 1.2 million in 1965. attendance for president obama's second inauguration is projected to be lower than his first. president george w. bush's second inaugural in 2005 drew up to 500,000 people.>> it may be sot before we get the official estimate of the crowd here, certainly not 1.8 million who were here in 2009, but estimates before the inauguration ranged from 600,000 to 800,000 but what we can report to you is that there were a lot of americans in the national mall today who were overjoyed to witness history, inauguration of any president is a remarkable moment in american history. and they were there today, many of them with their children to see these events. the president was inaugurated of course under the -- in the shadow i probably should say, the capitol dome. a fascinating thing about the dome of the capitol, this year is the 150th anniversary of the completion of the capitol dome. something that was mentioned today during the president's inauguration. h
sarah hughes who was summoned to duty aboard air force one with lyndon johnson following a national tragedy, for the fourth time in our nation's history a woman has sworn in either the president or the vice president of the united states. i had a chance to sit down with justice sotomayor this week to talk about her historic moment. >> i was thinking just a couple of days ago if i think back of when i was a kid, which of the two events would have seemed more improbable to me. i realized each one was so far fetched that i couldn't have imagined either. >> supreme court, swearing in the vice president? >> supreme court or swearing in the vice president in front of the nation and the world. >> does it make you anxious? >> anxiety is not the word. >> and you talked to her, soledad, about how she's perceived on the bench. >> yeah. and she's considered to be very tough and she doesn't really mind or care what people have -- have that analysis of how she is on the bench. here's what she told me. >> i think the noblest profession in the world is lawyering and if a lawyer showed up who wasn't
is the day that 40 years ago today, lyndon johnson died. i think he would have recognized and probably admired that speech yesterday very much. and i think one way of understanding it is to look at it as a reply to ronald reagan in 1981. in the same place ronald reagan got up and said government is not the solution to the problem, government is the problem. yesterday was sort of not only a response to that but almost a bookend as reagan moved the country in a conservative direction. barack obama obviously hopes to move it in a liberal direction. >> the "new york times" editorial had this to say. mr. obama is smart enough to know that what he wants to achieve in his second term must be done in the next two years, perhaps even the first 18 months. there is no doubt that mr. obama has the ambition and intellect to place himself in the first rank of presidents. with this speech, he has made a forceful argument for a progressive agenda that meets the nation's needs. we hope he has the political will and tactical instincts to carry it out. lot of things in that quote, but one that struck me,
to who i think is the king of them all. but lyndon johnson he picked up a couple. again, i'm using every thing i can find. pressing the flesh was a johnson is on. lady byrd johnson comes up with motorcade. it's picked up by time magazine. there was no example of that in writing before. richard nixon had some nice ones. expletive deleted is really his. when they go over the watergate trial, it became its own sort of curse word. another one was really interesting at the time. talking about winding down the war. george h. w. bush had his own words. the cheap shot was to say that these were all off the wall. the word resume came into the english language in 1531 and one other words of the words it was always attributed to him which was stranded jury, was actually a creation of saturday night live. [laughter] with the one you can really hang in business under estimate. there have been several pretty well-known people about language online. many top riders have said it is under estimate by mistake, what happens to all of us. so it may not be words like normalcy which will gradually become a mo
taking on gun owners. >> surely, fines osama bin laden surely passing civil rights legislation, as lyndon johnson did, and surely defeating nazis, waa much more form it able task than taking on the gun lobby. this is a turning point in this country. and the president, is going to have to to do more than just make a speech about it, this is one of the best speeches i heard him deliver. but it will take more than that from the white house, he will have to get his hands dirty. lou: exciting when you hear a man talk truth to power like that. >> it soups like he was reading it -- it looked likely was reading it he scripted those, i think any time get into comparing anything to naziism, to gag like thatto -- going likn gone too far, talking about law abiding americans, i think that is about as far off base as you can get lou: steve? >> well, i don't disagree with what he is saying, i don't like language, like the gun lobby as if they are the enemy or the cause of newtown, and i don't like the accusation that president obama wants to take away people's guns, there is good ideas on both sides, le
inaugural balls awaiting them. lyndon johnson made history, after one of the darkest days in america, the first president to ride to his inaugural in a bulletproof limo after the assassination of jfk. ronald reagan, second inaugural, so cold, only snow filled the stands. the public swearing-in ceremony, moved indoors. bill clinton ushering more than just a second term. the first to be carried on that thing called the internet. and on monday, president obama with the first lady by his side again, after already making history four years ago. in front of 2 million spectators. so much fun. our special report on the swearing-in just before noon tomorrow. i'll see you from washington with a special edition tomorrow night. and we'll all see you here on monday. good night. >>> next on abc7 news at 6:00, a deadly shooting shuts down a bart station in san lee an dough. excitement grows for 49ers fans. mike shumann is live in atlanta. >>> a high surf advisory and a big scare for surfers in san francisco today. abc7 news at 6:00 starts now. >> ama: good evening, i'm ama daetz. we begin with brea
. you could argue lyndon johnson interpreted his mandate in 1964 as a blank check in vietnam. that is one of the great dangers that confronts presidents. term curse. i think there are a number of factors. i think the word mandate should dictionary. in a polarized area, presidents have a tendency to over- interpret. -- over-interpret the mandate they have been given. host: let me add this iconic photograph of president bill clinton, hugging monica lewinsky. face impeachment. guest: we have been told by people who should know that president clinton was willing to capital he had. he won a significant, decisive victory over bob dole in 1996. he was prepared to move on entitlements, the so-called third rail of american politics, which would have required him spending a lot of political capital. then when the whole scandal broke, that was no longer a viable option. host: let me share with you this story from "the washington post." there is one sentence from this article i want you to react to. mcdonough is seen as an obama an eye on burnishing his legacy. guest: i think the press m
an agenda he didn't accomplish most of it it took lyndon johnson to actually make that into law later. it is a tough road but is a good positive strong start this second inaugural address is never as important as a looks. it's still a good step and a solid step i think you'll see a solid presidency second term personal exhaustion. i think at the moment coming off of the election coming off of the inauguration you will see a lot of energy in the white house for the next few months it becomes sort of a drive towards the last minute lame-duck no one in congress at least is paying a lot of attention to any more. by the end of the second term his hair is going to look like marks' probably. his hair was all black when he took office in its nearly all gray now. still ahead an all-star evening who is showing up tonight including the big one hosted by rahm emanuel. a solid gold treatment for cancer how the metal that makes up your favorite jewelry could save your life. hey, buddy? oh, hey, flo. you want to see something cool? snapshot, from progressive. my insurance company told me not to ta
. there were four inaugural balls awaiting them. lyndon johnson made history, after one of the darkest days in america, the first president to ride to his inaugural in a bulletproof limo after the assassination of jfk. bill clinton ushering more than just a second term. the first to be carried on that thing called the internet. on monday, president obama with the first lady by his side again, after already making history four years ago. in front of 2 million spectators. our special report on the swearing-in just before noon tomorrow. i'll see you from washington with a special edition tomorrow night. and we'll all see you here on monday. good night.
for dwight eisenhower giant platforms for the invited guests. lyndon johnson made history, the first president to ride to his inaugural in a bulletproof limo after the assassination of jfk. bill clinton ushering more than a second term. ushering the internet. on monday, president obama with the first lady by his side again since already making history four years ago. our special report on the swearing-in just before noon tomorrow. right here. i'll see you from washington tomorrow night. good night.
, right? lyndon johnson is getting sworn in on air force one. roosevelt had to go to a house in buffalo. there's one where mckinley died and one where roosevelt was sworn in and he kind of stumbled through it all, yeah i got the oath. so he didn't have his hand on the bible. he said a few words, but he became president. it reminds us that things are sometimes haphazard at inaugurations. we don't get to pre plain like we do for this one. >> president obama's first inauguration drew record crowds. how do you think it will be remembered? >> i have kids who have the place mat and on it you have presidents on it. it's all white faces and now you have the first african-american. man, was that historic. you had people pouring in here electricity in the air. it didn't matter what the speech was that year. it was about the atmospherics. this time around i think the speech the president gives is going to be more important. they're having less balls, less crowds, more enthusiasm. he can make up for that by having words that may some day be carved in marble. >> douglas brinkley.
as lyndon johnson was able to do and before that, surely defeating the nazis was a much more formidable task than taking on the fun lobby." schieffer -- the gun lobby." schieffer called the president's speech yesterday one of his best and said the president will have too get his hands dirty to prevent another massacre. a columnist for the "seminole county public examiner" slammed the remarks saying, "whatever do you, mean bob. were no times were fdr, lbj or obama committing any crime against the constitution when they defeated the nazis, passed civil rights legislation or killed bin laden respectively." continuing "a little free advice for bob schieffer, if you feel the need to opine about historical events on national tv, please get your facts straight." we have pointed out before, president obama's opinions have changed from when he was a u.s. and state senator on the debt ceiling, prosecuting the war on terror and it seems on gun policy. back in 1999 with the shooting at columbine high schoolbe fresh in everyone's minds, the illinois state senate took up a bill that would require adult pr
was rare. very, very rare. so in lyndon johnson's tenure as majority leader which ended when he was vice president in january of '61, there was one filibuster in his six years. and harry reid's six years, almost 400. that's the contrast. it's gradual. the right to filibuster has been there since the modern senate was there. but it's the perversion of senators that are willing to filibuster anything, any single thing they bring this to bear. >> describe that perversion. >> that perversion is everything from the almost 100 judicial vacancies that you talked about to many examples of recess appointments in the executive branch. we just spent $3 billion on a presidential election and the president's appointees, most of them he makes now are most likely never to get confirmed, unlikely to get debated, certainly unlikely to get discussed and certainly unlikely to serve. >> you want to end the filibuster. what's behind that? >> senator jeff morgan would make it essential that people talk. this is what the american people want. it would encourage debate, it wouldn't push it away. >> what is your
this after 380 filibusters compared to when lyndon johnson was the senate majority leader where he had one filibuster? >> well, this is the point, right? we have a senate that's frozen, broken, doesn't work. pick your favorite adjective or vertebrae. it's not working. this is not what democracy looks like. it's only on the first day and technically we're still in the first day of the congress, two-year period that this can be done by 51 senators, meaning in this case there's 55 in the democratic caucus and we'll take 51 of them. we need all of those 51 to stand up to have a senate that actually discusses the issues of the day. and allows the president's nominations to reach the floor and allows conference committees to actually meet. so when the house and senate pass two different bills there's a way to reconcile that. none of that is happening. >> harry reid said that he has been negotiating with senate minority leader mitch mcconnell to avoid having the so-called nuclear option. i would go so far as to say does mitch mcconnell even deserve to be in the position to negotiate what the sena
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 144 (some duplicates have been removed)